Info Favorites Register Log in
myArmoury.com Discussion Forums

Forum index Memberlist Usergroups Spotlight Topics Search
Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > Small Viking with Bearded Axe Reply to topic
Go to page 1, 2  Next 
Author Message
Eric McHugh




Usergroups: 
Donating Members
Industry Professionals

Location: Crown Point, IN
Posts: 336
PostPosted: Fri 12 May, 2006 2:00 pm    Post subject: Small Viking with Bearded Axe         Reply with quote

I just completed a bearded axe for Andy Bain. Here are a few pictures. This is based on my research at the National Museum in Denmark. That is my boy Nathan (6) who is holding it. He is hopelessly in love with this stuff...God help him.

The axe was constructed in a traditional manner. A mild steel eye socket was forge welded to a high carbon edge. I then differentially hardened the blade. The edge is 56-57 Rc and the body is soft. It doesn't look it, but it is a real monster. Nearly 4 pound total. In testing, it chopped through large pieces of wood with ease. The haft is made of oak.

I will have another one of these made in a few weeks if anyone is interested. Contact me via PM or ericmycue@verizon.net.



View user's profile Send private message
Bill Grandy
myArmoury Team


myArmoury Team

PostPosted: Fri 12 May, 2006 2:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Awesome, Eric! Hey, do you happen to have any pictures of the original?
Virginia Academy of Fencing Historical Swordsmanship
--German Longsword & Italian Rapier in the DC Area--


"A despondent heart will always be defeated regardless of skill."
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Martin Wallgren




Usergroups: None

Location: Bjästa, Sweden
Spotlight topics: 2
Posts: 620
PostPosted: Fri 12 May, 2006 2:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Yeah!

Nice !!!

Swordsman, Archer and Dad
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website MSN Messenger
Nathan Robinson
myArmoury Admin


myArmoury Admin

PostPosted: Fri 12 May, 2006 2:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Excellent work, Eric. Great choice on the naming of your son, too Happy I had the chance to "hang out" with Nathan before.. he's a great kid. You did great work on that front, too. His "Hot Wheels" shirt reminds me of what I used to wear in the 70s when I grew up.. ahh.. good stuff.

Cheers!

.:. Visit my Collection Gallery :: View my Reading List :: View my Wish List :: See Pages I Like :: Find me on Facebook .:.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website AIM Address
Greyson Brown




Usergroups: 
Donating Members

Location: Evans, Colorado
Reading list: 15 books
Posts: 739
PostPosted: Fri 12 May, 2006 2:49 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's a great looking axe, Eric. It looks like it's a really handy size, too.

Eric McHugh wrote:
I will have another one of these made in a few weeks if anyone is interested.


So we have to arm-wrestle Nathan (pick one, it probably doesn't matter), and then what else? Laughing Out Loud

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Fri 12 May, 2006 4:58 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nice looking axe and maybe you could get your son a nice Hauberk, shield and Spangenhelm in his size to go along with it. Big Grin

I'm sure he would like the idea. Wink Laughing Out Loud

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
View user's profile Send private message
Joseph C.




Usergroups: 
Donating Members

Location: Pensacola, Florida
Posts: 56
PostPosted: Fri 12 May, 2006 8:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is a nice looking axe! There are not enough reproductions like that around.
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
B. Stark




PostPosted: Fri 12 May, 2006 10:33 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I'm liking the way these are turning out. Excellent work.
"Wyrd bi∂ ful aræd"

Are we at last brought to such humiliating and debasing degradation, that we cannot be trusted with arms for our defense?

Patrick Henry
View user's profile Send private message
Patrik Erik Lars Lindblom




Usergroups: 
Donating Members

Location: Göteborg Sweden
Reading list: 8 books
Posts: 416
PostPosted: Sat 13 May, 2006 1:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Cool Yeah!
Love it and Hugg is his name Happy

Frid o Fröjd!
Patrik
View user's profile Send private message
Eric McHugh




Usergroups: 
Donating Members
Industry Professionals

Location: Crown Point, IN
Posts: 336
PostPosted: Sat 13 May, 2006 7:23 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you one and all.

Here is a picture of the original I used. I made the langets more pointed on this one because I wasn't sure if people were ready for the rounded style. There are examples of both styles, but the pointed ones seem to be the style that is most accepted as "typical." I will probably make some with the rounded style because...well they look cool!



This axe was fun to make. Each one teaches me something new. I do seem to get small surface flaws were the eyesocket steel is transitioning to the blade steel. I believe this is the result of the forgewelding. You do see this sort of thing on originals. Oh well...they certainly do not look out of place for a period piece and they definately DO NOT hinder the performance...this is a compact bundle of whoop-arse!!!

Thank you everyone for your interest.
View user's profile Send private message
Greyson Brown




Usergroups: 
Donating Members

Location: Evans, Colorado
Reading list: 15 books
Posts: 739
PostPosted: Sat 13 May, 2006 1:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Eric,

Thanks for pointing out those rounded langets. If I have seen that before, I definately overlooked it.

I would agree that, if you are getting surface flaws, it is probably the result of the forge weld. On the other hand, it sure doesn't look like you have a cold shut. It's still a good solid weld, so I wouldn't worry about it too much.

I've been contemplating what I want to do when I get access to a forge again (should happen soon with my return to the States). You may have just inspired me. The only other axe I have forged was a small camp axe made from a railroad spike, so I really want to see if I can do something more historical and involved.

-Grey

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company


Last edited by Greyson Brown on Sat 13 May, 2006 2:59 pm; edited 1 time in total
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Eric McHugh




Usergroups: 
Donating Members
Industry Professionals

Location: Crown Point, IN
Posts: 336
PostPosted: Sat 13 May, 2006 2:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greyson Brown wrote:


I would agree that, if you are getting surface flaws, it is probably the result of the forge weld. On the other hand, it sure doesn't look like you have a cold shut. It's still a good solid weld, so I wouldn't worry about it too much.


Yes, I agree, it is not a cold shut. I've done enough of these now to realize that as the material that makes up the eye gets thinner from being forged out, the transition zone gets a little uneven and some pits open up. If it was pattern weld, these little pits would not be there because when it is folded another layer is welded on top and eventually it is folded out, but since there is no fold and it is only one weld, these pits just sorta pop up in places. The axe is definately secure as far as the weld goes, so like you said, nothing to worry about. I thought about welding them with my torch, but to be honest, they kinda look cool. They look in character with the piece. :-)
View user's profile Send private message
Craig Peters




PostPosted: Sat 13 May, 2006 2:45 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Eric McHugh wrote:
Greyson Brown wrote:


I would agree that, if you are getting surface flaws, it is probably the result of the forge weld. On the other hand, it sure doesn't look like you have a cold shut. It's still a good solid weld, so I wouldn't worry about it too much.


Yes, I agree, it is not a cold shut. I've done enough of these now to realize that as the material that makes up the eye gets thinner from being forged out, the transition zone gets a little uneven and some pits open up. If it was pattern weld, these little pits would not be there because when it is folded another layer is welded on top and eventually it is folded out, but since there is no fold and it is only one weld, these pits just sorta pop up in places. The axe is definately secure as far as the weld goes, so like you said, nothing to worry about. I thought about welding them with my torch, but to be honest, they kinda look cool. They look in character with the piece. :-)


Eric,

What price were you asking for the second copy of this axe? For that matter, how much do you charge (ballpark range) for custome made axes similar to this one?
View user's profile Send private message
Andy Bain




Usergroups: 
Donating Members

Location: Surrey, BC, Canada
Posts: 119
PostPosted: Sun 14 May, 2006 2:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I thought I'd pipe up and mention that Eric is a great guy to work with. We started off with me wanting an axe that would fit in the Viking period. Eric helped me narrow it down from there by sending me pictures of existing pieces as well as drawings showing the profile of the various axe types. Once I had picked out the one I wanted he kept me well informed of the progress of the project. And to top it off he got it done way sooner than he had originally estimated.

The only complaint I have is, due to the distance between BC and Wisconsin, I won't be able to pour Eric a glass of vintage port to say thanks. I 'll just have to drink it myself and say a toast in his name. Wink
View user's profile Send private message
Randal Graham




Usergroups: 
Industry Professionals

Location: Nova Scotia Canada
Posts: 79
PostPosted: Wed 17 May, 2006 6:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Eric, you're not giving yourself enough credit on the quality of the weld and the construction of the axe... you're making it hard for yourself to begin with by putting a finish on that axe that is so far beyond what was likely given them historically that I can't help but look at the picture, scratch my head, and say "what pit?"

Nice job.

R.H.Graham
Swordsmith
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
Eric McHugh




Usergroups: 
Donating Members
Industry Professionals

Location: Crown Point, IN
Posts: 336
PostPosted: Wed 17 May, 2006 12:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Randal Graham wrote:
Eric, you're not giving yourself enough credit on the quality of the weld and the construction of the axe... you're making it hard for yourself to begin with by putting a finish on that axe that is so far beyond what was likely given them historically that I can't help but look at the picture, scratch my head, and say "what pit?" Nice job.


Thanks!

Well, you know how it is. Makers are their worst critics. ;-) Never happy with it, always doubting...
View user's profile Send private message
Lee Reeves




Usergroups: 
Donating Members
Industry Professionals

Location: Wasilla Alaska
Posts: 185
PostPosted: Fri 19 May, 2006 10:42 am    Post subject: eric         Reply with quote

I am in the market for that type of axe too. What would be the price and wait time

Lee

Not everything has to be decided at the point of a sword, but somethings can only be decided at the point of a sword.
View user's profile Send private message
Alexander Hinman




Usergroups: 
Donating Members

Location: washington, dc
Reading list: 50 books
Posts: 153
PostPosted: Sat 20 May, 2006 2:57 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is a really nice axe, Eric. It's good to see some top-shelf hafted weapons nowadays.

I have two questions, though.

First, how did you forge out the langets? I've been considering making an axe, but, mentally I am always stuck on the langets.

Second, what type of tongs did you use when welding? Did you use two kinds, for that matter?

Once again, that is an awesome piece of steel and wood there.
View user's profile Send private message
Eric McHugh




Usergroups: 
Donating Members
Industry Professionals

Location: Crown Point, IN
Posts: 336
PostPosted: Sun 21 May, 2006 7:00 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Alexander Hinman wrote:
That is a really nice axe, Eric. It's good to see some top-shelf hafted weapons nowadays.

I have two questions, though.

First, how did you forge out the langets? I've been considering making an axe, but, mentally I am always stuck on the langets.

Second, what type of tongs did you use when welding? Did you use two kinds, for that matter?

Once again, that is an awesome piece of steel and wood there.


That's a good question. When I first started making these, I would make a "bow-tie" piece of steel with crude langets already in place. The result was misaligned langets etc. So now, I make an almost straight piece (still somewhat like a bow-tie) and just concentrate on making a good eye for the socket. I then clean that piece up and do some shaping on the grinder according to my drawings. I then forge weld the socket to the blade material. After that is done, I clean it up and then do the final shaping of the langets using my small diameter wheels.

I use bolt tongs that I have modified to hold the eye in place when forge welding. Other than that, I have a variety of wolf jaw tongs that I use. You may have to modify tongs or make your own according to what you believe feels best. You need one to hold the eye when you are making it...I use wolf jaws for this...you need another to hold the eye when you forge weld it to the blade (I use a small tack weld to keep them from moving...this of course gets ground off) so that is where the bolt tongs come in handy. They fit in each side of the eye. I then heat the whole thing to welding temp. and then forge weld them together.

I guess my advise is focus on making the eye the right shape and do not worry about the langets. Just leave yourself enough material that you can grind them in when you are finished. I have a pile of ruined attempts at the smithy because I was focusing on trying to do too many things at once. :-)

Other than that it is trial and error. Modern mild steel and higher carbon simple steel do not like to weld (compared to the steel the ancients would have used) It requires high heat and fast, decisive hammer strikes (but not heavy). Usually it takes a number of heats to have it completely welded. One other note: I only heat treat the edge. I am a little nervous about blowing a weld by trying to harden the whole blade area. Plus, it is not necessary. The unharded body gives the axe more shock resistence.
View user's profile Send private message
Randal Graham




Usergroups: 
Industry Professionals

Location: Nova Scotia Canada
Posts: 79
PostPosted: Sun 21 May, 2006 7:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Eric McHugh wrote:


Modern mild steel and higher carbon simple steel do not like to weld (compared to the steel the ancients would have used) It requires high heat and fast, decisive hammer strikes (but not heavy). Usually it takes a number of heats to have it completely welded. One other note: I only heat treat the edge. I am a little nervous about blowing a weld by trying to harden the whole blade area. Plus, it is not necessary. The unharded body gives the axe more shock resistence.


Funny how form and function dictates the process.... there's every indication that this was the "way" for the last 2000 years or so. Cool.

R.H.Graham
Swordsmith
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website


Display posts from previous:   
Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > Small Viking with Bearded Axe
Page 1 of 2 Reply to topic
Go to page 1, 2  Next All times are GMT - 8 Hours

View previous topic :: View next topic
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum






All contents © Copyright 2003-2014 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Basic Low-bandwidth Version of the forum