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Forum Index > Makers and Manufacturers Talk > New type Z/weird viking sword from Michael Pikula Reply to topic
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Michael Pikula




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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 8:34 pm    Post subject: New type Z/weird viking sword from Michael Pikula         Reply with quote

I wanted to share a sword that I just finished up today. This is a commission that I am doing with Tim Lison, and there is a scabbard in progress, but wanted to take a few minutes to share the sword since I think it turned out great. It is based off of an original and was my first time working with hollow guards in addition to a hollow pommel. For the grip we decided to use stag and Tim suggested mimicked the carving off a find published in Lech Marek's book "Early Medieval Swords from Central and Eastern Europe" I decided do make the grip as a set of scales since I think it was one way that it could have been done, as well as ensure that the outer layer of the stag wasn't ground through and expose the softer marrow on the inside. I wanted to create a mechanical bond around the scales as an added safety measure, so I decided to add two bands of silver wire around the top and base.

Here are a few stats.
Length overall: 37"
Blade Length: 30.6"
Blade width at guard: 2.5"
Weight : 2lb 11oz
Point of Balance: 4 forward of guard
Point of rotation and forward node: 20" forward of guard



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Vincent C




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PostPosted: Tue 01 Nov, 2011 8:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is an amazingly beautiful sword! Where was the original from?
Honor, compassion, knowledge.
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William Swiger




PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 12:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very well done Michael.
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David Huggins




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 1:13 am    Post subject: Viking sword         Reply with quote

Very very nice Michael, looks fantastic!

best
Dave

and he who stands and sheds blood with us, shall be as a brother.
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Rusty Thomas




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 2:04 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's beautiful. You are truly an artist Michael.
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Viktor Abrahamson




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 2:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Vincent C wrote:
That is an amazingly beautiful sword! Where was the original from?


I would guess Historiska Museet in Stockholm.
Tim was looking for pictures of it some time ago.

And I agree it really looks fantastic.

/Viktor
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Timo Nieminen




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 2:10 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Remarkably Celtic! Earlier today, saw a photo of a Del Tin Celtic sword (DT201A, anthropomorphic hilt), and this has a very similar overall visual appearance. If one had bad eyesight, and no glasses, one could mistake one for the other.
"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Viktor Abrahamson




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 2:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I was thinking of this one,



/Viktor
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Johan Gemvik




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 3:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice reproduction of that sword!

I was looking at it in the museum a while back and wondering if someone's was ever going to make an authentic repro of it instead of the somewhat "inspired" pieces between this one and another similar one we see all over that don't look right, and now you have and in a spectacular manner to boot!
I've seen reindeer antler handle halves very similar to the scales you used, though with a different carved motif, so its definitely most plausible. It also looks great, especially the way it follows the lines of the hilt pieces like that. Wink

"The Dwarf sees farther than the Giant when he has the giant's shoulder to mount on" -Coleridge
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Jim Adelsen




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 4:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very well done! One of my favorite original swords. Very unique.
www.viking-shield.com
www.thevikingmuseum.com
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J Helmes




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PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 4:22 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Wonderful work Michael!
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Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 5:58 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Brilliant work, Michael! Happy Lets get a Tod's Stuff scabbard on that sword, stat! Big Grin
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Tim Lison




PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 8:12 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks great Michael! This was a fun project to see come together. I love working with Michael as he is really good about communication, providing regular updates with photos. It's really cool to see this sword finished and I can't wait to get it in my hands! Michael will be making a scabbard for it so I still have to wait a bit. Seeing these pictures doesn't help my patience...
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Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 1:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tim Lison wrote:
Michael will be making a scabbard for it so I still have to wait a bit.


Sounds equally appealing. Congratulations on an amazing piece, and best of luck with your patience!
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 1:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tim Lison wrote:
Looks great Michael! This was a fun project to see come together. I love working with Michael as he is really good about communication, providing regular updates with photos. It's really cool to see this sword finished and I can't wait to get it in my hands! Michael will be making a scabbard for it so I still have to wait a bit. Seeing these pictures doesn't help my patience...


I agree completely about working with Michael really feels like " working with " the maker as he listens to one's objectives and intent in a project and contributes with his own suggestions and it's often a good idea to give him general direction but let him make most of the design decisions. ( At times even better to just let him loose and micromanage as little as possible. Wink Laughing Out Loud ).

Hollow guard and pommel: It would be interesting to learn how he did this ? Castings would work in bronze or maybe even silver
( expensive ! ), but these look like steel and since Michael usually does his work by forging it must be a " tour de force " to forge hollow pieces ?

I have trouble imagining how one would do this ? Maybe in two pieces and then forged welded into a closed unit ?

Well, maybe Michael can chime in with some details on how the guard and pommel was made.

Congratulation Tim on being the happy owner of this sword. Big Grin

His sword does look very close to the original and is superb: Strange how the original design look weirdly modern or " Art deco ", very organic and geometric at the same time.

Anyway, a very attractive piece and one I would greatly enjoy to handle if it was possible. Wink Big Grin Cool

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Colt Reeves




PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 3:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Heh. Compare it to Windlass's version: http://kultofathena.com/images/501054_2_l.jpg

One of these is better than the other. I'll give you three guesses as to which one it is, and the first two don't count.

"Tears are for the craven, prayers are for the clown.
Halters for the silly neck that cannot keep a crown.
As my loss is grievous, so my hope is small.
For Iron, Cold Iron, must be master of men all..."
-Cold Iron, Rudyard Kipling
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J.D. Crawford




PostPosted: Wed 02 Nov, 2011 4:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's a most impressive piece of work - both the original and this new masterpiece. I'm surprised the CoG came out at 4", especially as the hilt furniture is hollow as described. Do we know that the original was hollow?

By the way, I used to have one of those Windlass versions. Other than the poor balance, unhistorical proportions, lousy harmonics, and loose pommel, it wasn't so bad. Wink
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Ken Speed




PostPosted: Thu 03 Nov, 2011 10:06 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

OK, I don't understand. Its a breathtaking, wonderfully crafted sword patterned after an existing historical example; why is is "weird"?
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Thu 03 Nov, 2011 10:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ken Speed wrote:
OK, I don't understand. Its a breathtaking, wonderfully crafted sword patterned after an existing historical example; why is is "weird"?



Weird only meaning surprising and unexpected design. ( Unless one has seen the original before or taken notice of it )

And like I said the design is very Art Deco to my eye, but this isn't a bad thing, only a personal observation. Big Grin Cool

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Juan Cocinas




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PostPosted: Thu 03 Nov, 2011 4:55 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Just Wow! You are an inspiration, Michael.
"Resist your time- take a foothold outside it." Lord Acton
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