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Folkert van Wijk




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PostPosted: Sat 10 Sep, 2005 11:32 am    Post subject: Should I blunt my sword or not??         Reply with quote

A question I have bin thinking about for a while is:
Wether or not I should blunt down my albion la tene II sword.

It is now razor sharp probably right as it was from the workshop
But I do not tend to use it for gutting. (and I don't know if I ever will)
Instead I would like to take it along to shows and such.
I only don't feel like carrying and showing it around sharp as it is now.
Probably it is not allowed two here in the Netherlands

Do you guys carry around sharp sword on shows??

So my questions are
1 how far would I destroy the geometry of the blade with blunting it?
2 would it be possible to sharpen it maybe again in the future if I changed my mind??
3 and if i decide to blunt it, can i do it myself?? With a file and sanding paper??
4 do my questions make sense??

A good sword will only be sharp, in the hands of a wise manů

I am great fan of everything Celtic BC, including there weapons.
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Hisham Gaballa




PostPosted: Sat 10 Sep, 2005 1:02 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Its funny but I've been thinking the same thing. I've recently acquired an antique 19th century Indian tulwar, and much to my surprise it was quite sharp. Quite literally to my surprise, there was a crack I didn't notice in the edge of the scabbard and as I drew the sword for the first time I caused very minors cuts to my fingers that were holding the scabbard.

I have 2 little children (8 and 6) who are both curious and very resourceful. I also want to blunten the sword but without damaging it. At the moment I'm having to keep it in a cardboard box at the very top of my bookcase.
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Adam Welch




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PostPosted: Sat 10 Sep, 2005 3:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, most of the faires I go to you have to peace tie your blades so they can't be drawn anyway, so it may not be a problem for the sharp sword at the faire. You don't even need your blade to be razor sharp to be a good cutter. If you want to dull just slightly, run a file perpindicular to the edge, VERY VERY VERY VERY LIGHTLY to begin with. Do this once and try to cut a sheet of paper. Repeat this until its to the degree of dullness desired. It shouldn't be a big deal to make it razor again. It would depend on the shape of the edge so you might want to ask some of the other guys to explain it probably more thouroughly than I can.
Factus est Dominus Protector Meus!
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Sat 10 Sep, 2005 4:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A smooth piece or hardened steel rubbed on the edge should dull it down enough that casual touching won't draw blood but still very sword sharp: Not safe to wield negligently though and certainly not the kind of dulling that would make it safe for sparring.

Sort of butter knife sharp but with the geometry largely intact: Resharpening if you change your mind should be possible although doing this repeatedly would accelerate blade wear.

A file as suggested would also work but might create micro serrations that might still leave hot spots on the blade and a rough finish, the smooth steel should polish and round the edge and be very smooth.

Though everything above depends on how dull you want to go.

Instead of a file a fine ceramic hone would dull the edge a bit more and faster than the smooth steel and not as crudely as the file.

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Patrick Fitzmartin




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PostPosted: Sat 10 Sep, 2005 4:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greetings Folkert van Wijk, By the High Ones no! If you need a blunt, buy a blunt. I have worked too hard sharpening blunts. I wear sharps to the Tex. Ren Fest. However I do not draw them and I make scabbards for them. If you are doing demos then you should equip yourself in the proper manner. You may be able to dull your sword but you might not be able to bring it back if you change your mind. I would not risk this. A good part of a demo is the fact that it is a "live" blade and should be respected as such. If you feel that you can not control the situation then don't break the "peace tie". Do not make the sword suffer for what you might try to do with it. Wink Just my two cents. Wink Sincerely, Patrick Fitzmartin
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Sat 10 Sep, 2005 4:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Oh, I agree with what Patrick F. just said about keeping a sharp SHARP, my suggestion was how to do it as minimally as possible.

Getting a blunt if you need a blunt is the best way to go: As even a blunt can kill someone if taken lightly and used negligently. A blunt can also make you careless if you " play " with both! Which one was the blunt again. Razz Eek!

Personally I like to be able to at least cut paper with swords and be able to shave with knives

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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Patrick Fitzmartin




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PostPosted: Sat 10 Sep, 2005 5:12 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greetings Hisham Gaballa, I have 3 grandchildren. Aged 11, 5 and 3. Part of our ritual in visits is to "hold" Grandpa's swords. By the laws of my anscestor's, they should not be touching steel. They are not of "weapon bearing" age. I bend this however because of their earnest interest. Eek! While "Grandpa" endures an elavated stress level thru this, they are taught that they are handling a dangerous object. Anybody not following the "rules' is ejected severly at once. Wink I also let them know that the "swords" have rights of their own and if they are cut, it is their own fault. We also have several cats. They have been warned which cats may bite and which may not. As hard as it seems, children need to learn to adapt to the world around them because the world will not adapt to them.
I would not dull the tulwar. If your children "blood" themselves on it, I would praise them for their strength and bravery. They will be better for it as life has a whole lot of hard knocks ahead. Wink Sincerely, Patrick Fitzmartin
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Folkert van Wijk




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PostPosted: Sun 11 Sep, 2005 3:04 am    Post subject: blunting or not         Reply with quote

Thanks every one!
Enough stuff to think it over again.

I am not planning on sparring with it I only would like to be able to show the blade to people.
Because the thinness and lightness of it are "striking" and different then what one would espect from a (ironage) sword..
And so making it able to tell about the Celtic hight skilled weapon smiths and other craftsmen.

I quess where all on a mission to tell and show people about our passion and our shared (ancient) history.
And so are looking for ways to this safely and yet as accurate as possible.
In my field of (Celtic) interest it's hart to find good affordable swords especially blunts so that made me wander...

Any other suggestions and comments are still welcome though.

Folkert

A good sword will only be sharp, in the hands of a wise manů

I am great fan of everything Celtic BC, including there weapons.
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Mark Eskra




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PostPosted: Thu 15 Jun, 2006 7:30 am    Post subject: in a pinch         Reply with quote

I'v never intentionally dulled a blade, but it would only lose part of its effectiveness. remember, the swing force is focussed on the skinny edge, and will still break bones. So if it comes to whackin, hit im' in the arm or neck.
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Joe Fults




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PostPosted: Thu 15 Jun, 2006 7:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick Fitzmartin wrote:
Greetings Folkert van Wijk, By the High Ones no! If you need a blunt, buy a blunt. I have worked too hard sharpening blunts. I wear sharps to the Tex. Ren Fest. However I do not draw them and I make scabbards for them. If you are doing demos then you should equip yourself in the proper manner. You may be able to dull your sword but you might not be able to bring it back if you change your mind. I would not risk this. A good part of a demo is the fact that it is a "live" blade and should be respected as such. If you feel that you can not control the situation then don't break the "peace tie". Do not make the sword suffer for what you might try to do with it. Wink Just my two cents. Wink Sincerely, Patrick Fitzmartin


I have to agree with Patrick's recommendation.

I've carried sharps and blunts in scabbards at events and next had a roblem with either. If anything I find there is less temptation (for me) to do anything cavalier when I have a sharp on my hip.

Joe Fults

"INVENIEMUS VIAM AUT FACIEMUS (We will either find a way or make one)" Hannibal

"Our life is what our thoughts make it" Marcus Aurelius
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Stein Llanos




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PostPosted: Thu 15 Jun, 2006 3:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

In my opinion swords should be handled as the weapons they are - with due respect. Teaching your children this is the first and most important step in keeping them safe. If you are respectful and take care when handling the sword, so will they.

I've cut myself with swords and knives on several occasions, fortunately my inherent respect for these objects have kept the damage to a minimum - the body heals itself and the mind learns a lesson. A blade does neither.
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Steve Grisetti




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PostPosted: Thu 15 Jun, 2006 3:30 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I have an Albion 1st Gen Mainz Gladius that seemed "scary" sharp when I received it - by far the sharpest of all of my swords. I dulled the edge slightly by running #0000 steel wool perpendicular to the edge. I think this would be easier on the edge than a file, but will take longer for a given amount of reduction in sharpness.

I have not felt the need to dullen any of my other swords. By the way, I also have a 1st Gen La Tene II that came to me (second hand) with the edge already much less sharp than the Mainz. I don't know, however, if the first owner had worked on the edge or not.

"...dismount thy tuck, be yare in thy preparation, for thy assailant is quick, skilful, and deadly."
- Sir Toby Belch
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Jean Thibodeau




PostPosted: Thu 15 Jun, 2006 6:28 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Steve Grisetti wrote:
I have an Albion 1st Gen Mainz Gladius that seemed "scary" sharp when I received it - by far the sharpest of all of my swords. I dulled the edge slightly by running #0000 steel wool perpendicular to the edge. I think this would be easier on the edge than a file, but will take longer for a given amount of reduction in sharpness.

I have not felt the need to dull any of my other swords. By the way, I also have a 1st Gen La Tene II that came to me (second hand) with the edge already much less sharp than the Mainz. I don't know, however, if the first owner had worked on the edge or not.


If you dull it to just paper cutting edge it should be easy ( In theory ) to get it that sharp again but you might created a secondary bevel: A small one you might only see with a magnifying glass.

I stopped being fanatical about making all my knives and swords hair popping sharp but most of my knives are that sharp.
I rarely cut myself and usually it's just a nick, maybe 3 or 4 deeper cuts in total at 56 years alive and playing with sharp stuff for more than 45 ! Luck, skill or respect Wink Eek! Laughing Out Loud Question

You can easily give up your freedom. You have to fight hard to get it back!
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