Go to page 1, 2, 3 ... 18, 19, 20  Next

Examples from the Musée de l'Armée Paris
Some pieces from this excellent collection to share with you.

The first sword is dated 1350 A.D.


 Attachment: 71.66 KB, Viewed: 17478 times
Pic1.JPG


 Attachment: 53.91 KB, Viewed: 17438 times
Pic2.JPG


 Attachment: 58.88 KB, Viewed: 17504 times
Pic3.JPG

The next sword is French and is dated 1480 A.D. Look at the close-up of the blade and how well it is preserved.


 Attachment: 71.48 KB, Viewed: 16142 times
Pic4.JPG


 Attachment: 60.74 KB, Viewed: 16045 times
Pic5.JPG


 Attachment: 74.78 KB, Viewed: 15869 times
Pic6.JPG

The following is the sword made for Francois I, the blade is Italian attributed to 1480 A.D.


 Attachment: 51.87 KB, Viewed: 15711 times
Pic8.JPG


 Attachment: 72.13 KB, Viewed: 15603 times
Pic9.JPG


 Attachment: 73.94 KB, Viewed: 15571 times
Pic10.JPG

A rapier with an enameled handle


 Attachment: 68.21 KB, Viewed: 15395 times
Pic12.JPG

Other swords


 Attachment: 81.23 KB, Viewed: 15299 times
Pic13.JPG

Look at that Scottish Claymore, that is really lovely.


 Attachment: 78.03 KB, Viewed: 17023 times
Pic15.JPG

Thank you

As for the writing IN BRACHIO SVO it just means in his arm
Hello all!

Manoucher,

This is why I love this site!
Thanks for the lovely photos. I've seen drawings of the first two swords, but never photos of the actual pieces. The first sword, the possible royal sword dated 1350, is Type XIV. 8 in Ewart Oakeshott's Records of the Medieval Sword. The inscription reads (according to Oakeshott): "NULLA DE VIRTUTIBUS TUIS MAJOR CLEMENTIA EST" ("Nothing of your virtues is greater than clemency"). It's nice to see a different type XIV; there aren't a lot of them out there. It's also nice to see the gold plating on the hilt in colour.

The second sword and scabbard, dated 1480, is in a black & white illustration in Paul Martin's Arms and Armour from the 9th to the 17th Century. According to the caption in Martin's book, the sword is the parade sword of the Constable of France. It's lovely to see this in colour.

Thanks again for sharing!
Thanks for that! Reminds me that I really should visit this museum again :)

Bruno Giordan wrote:

As for the writing IN BRACHIO SVO it just means in his arm


In fact it's said in the notice that the writing begins on the other side of the sword and reads:

FECIT POTENTIAM / IN BRACHIO SUO

a verse from the Magnificat.

Regards
Vincent Le Chevalier wrote:
Thanks for that! Reminds me that I really should visit this museum again :)

Bruno Giordan wrote:

As for the writing IN BRACHIO SVO it just means in his arm


In fact it's said in the notice that the writing begins on the other side of the sword and reads:

FECIT POTENTIAM / IN BRACHIO SUO

a verse from the Magnificat.

Regards


He gave power (strength) to this arm (literally: he made power into his arm).
Thanks for sharing. :)

The two swords under the claymore look nice also, and so the Swiss degen in the right corner of the same pic...

Edit : the notice of the first sword says it has a fuller. Can't see it from here however.
Hello again!
Hugo Voisine wrote:

the notice of the first sword says it has a fuller. Can't see it from here however.


Hugo,
Oakeshott's illustration of this sword in Records of the Medieval Sword, a type XIV from circa 1300-1350, certainly shows a fuller. It probably just didn't show in Manoucher's photos.

Here's Oakshott's illustration of that particular sword in the Musee de l'Armee, Paris:


 Attachment: 23.95 KB, Viewed: 15108 times
Type XIV. 8 from Records of the Medieval Sword.JPG
Type XIV. 8 from Records of the Medieval Sword.


Last edited by Richard Fay on Sat 30 Dec, 2006 4:33 pm; edited 1 time in total
The fuller is a bit more visible in this version, with some exposure compensation.


 Attachment: 26.22 KB, Viewed: 14926 times
download-8.jpg

Hi Nathan,

Thank you. Yes indeed it has a fuller. Thanks for working on the picture. It looks much nicer now. :-)

The next sword is attributed to Kind Henry II and is described as an estoc.


 Attachment: 77.35 KB, Viewed: 14858 times
PIc18.JPG


 Attachment: 92.24 KB, Viewed: 14797 times
Pic17.JPG


 Attachment: 91.03 KB, Viewed: 14758 times
Pic19.JPG

Bruno Giordan wrote:
Thank you

As for the writing IN BRACHIO SVO it just means in his arm


You are welcome Bruno. Which sword are you talking about? Sorry I am confused.

KInd regards

Manouchehr
Richard Fay wrote:
Hello all!

Manoucher,


Thanks again for sharing!


You are welcome Richard. Thanks for the information.

Kind regards

Manouchehr
Vincent Le Chevalier wrote:
Thanks for that! Reminds me that I really should visit this museum again :)

Bruno Giordan wrote:

As for the writing IN BRACHIO SVO it just means in his arm


In fact it's said in the notice that the writing begins on the other side of the sword and reads:

FECIT POTENTIAM / IN BRACHIO SUO

a verse from the Magnificat.

Regards


Now I see what Bruno meant. Thanks Vincent.

Kind regards

Manouchehr
Hugo Voisine wrote:
Thanks for sharing. :)

The two swords under the claymore look nice also, and so the Swiss degen in the right corner of the same pic...

Edit : the notice of the first sword says it has a fuller. Can't see it from here however.


You are welcome Hugo.

Kind regards

Manouchehr
Thanks for posting all of these great pictures! It really makes a difference for someone in an area with not so many good museums. I really appreciate it.

Max
That estoc of Henry II's is awesome. Check out the Hs forming cross-guard finials and incorporated into the side ring and pommel. Very unusual.
Go to page 1, 2, 3 ... 18, 19, 20  Next

Page 1 of 20

Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You cannot attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum




All contents © Copyright 2003-2006 myArmoury.com — All rights reserved
Discussion forums powered by phpBB © The phpBB Group
Switch to the Full-featured Version of the forum