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Forum Index > Historical Arms Talk > British Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Officer's Sword Reply to topic
 
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Jonathan Hopkins




PostPosted: Tue 11 Mar, 2008 5:37 pm    Post subject: British Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Officer's Sword         Reply with quote

To complement the recent threads on 19th century military swords...

The Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Officer's Sword is late Georgian in origin and enjoyed a long lifespan as it was not replaced until 1896 when it was superseded by the Pattern 1821 Heavy Cavalry Officer's Sword. Therefore, this pattern would have been used by light cavalry officers in virtually all of the well-known cavalry actions of the Victorian era, including the Charge of the Light Brigade.



From its inception until the mid 1840s, the P1821 had a 35 1/2" slightly curved pipe back blade with a spear point that was double edged for approximately the last 10". At some point in the 1840s, this pipe back blade was replaced by a "Wilkinson" style blade that has one broad fuller on each side. Another characteristic of late Georgian through early Victorian P1821s is the more pronounced stepped pommel, a feature that diminishes and virtually disappears by the close of the Victorian era.



The Pattern 1821 Light Cavalry Officer's Sword was also adopted by the Royal Horse Artillery, and later, other officers of the Royal Artillery. Other nations copied this pattern, one well-known example being the U.S. Model 1833 Dragoon Sword.



The 35 inch blade is etched on either side with foliage and VR cyphers (VR for Victoria Regina--Queen Victoria). There is no maker name, unfortunately. The transition from the pipe back to the false edge (yelman) is quite nicely done. Besides the pipe back blade, this example features the pronounced stepped pommel that is characteristic of earlier P1821s. The fish skin (shagreen) grip has some losses and still has its copper wire fully intact. The blade still sits firmly in the scabbard.



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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Wed 12 Mar, 2008 8:15 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I really like the "spear point" false edge. Really interesting!
inkothemgard!
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