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J. Hargis




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PostPosted: Fri 25 May, 2012 9:36 pm    Post subject: That 'chiming' sound and it's significance.         Reply with quote

I've noted that many makers and collectors refer affectionately to a certain 'chiming' sound when various swords are struck lightly. Much like the ring of fine crystal. Clearly this is related to resonance upon impact.

Some questions on that phenomenon.

- Does the duration of the chime have value in determining a sword's quality?
I would think a sword's build 'tightness' (all parts fitting properly together) would create a longer, sustained ring.

- Does the pitch of the chime have value in determining a sword's quality?

- Is pitch determined by the size and / or shape of sword blade?

I hope I'm not being to overly abstract here. Thanks for you thoughts.

Jon

A poorly maintained weapon is likely to belong to an unsafe and careless fighter.
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Timo Nieminen




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PostPosted: Fri 25 May, 2012 10:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If something absorbs the energy of the vibrations, it won't ring. Loose hilts would be a typical cause. Maybe leather spacers, anything shock-absorbent around the tang (like some glues), etc.

A serious defect in the blade - like a crack - might do the same (but might not).

The pitch is affected by the shape of the blade, where you hold it, and where you strike it. Also by the size, but that has less effect. I don't think the pitch has anything to do with the quality.

A "ringing" sword is not necessarily a good sword. It might be, or it might not be. As you suppose, it can indicate tight assembly. Lack of ringing can indicate loose assembly.

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Vue QT




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PostPosted: Sat 26 May, 2012 3:01 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Not sure what you mean by 'Ringing', did you mean something like this

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=316yM-wjlrI
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Brandt Giese




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PostPosted: Sat 26 May, 2012 10:46 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Not sure how to attach the link but this topic was covered well and is in the spotlight section under Dynamics,Properties, and performance and is titled The Ring of Steel.
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Luka Borscak




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PostPosted: Sat 26 May, 2012 10:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here it is: http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=1488
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Daniel Wallace




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PostPosted: Sat 26 May, 2012 12:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

different alloys will also have different qualities in a 'ring' for instance stainless steel truly rings and holds a tone for a while, where carbon steel sound like you plucked a rubber band.

i'm wondering if this is coming up from the first conan movie where he's seen plucking swords to estimate their quality. i think it's more of a myth than any reality to believe if a sword rings true it's better quality.

i usually like to bend a blade a little to make sure it bounces back to shape to test the steels quality, or make sure that a file skips across the blade to test it's temper. i don't know if there's any visual ways other than looking for cracks on the surface of the steel that might lead someone to believe a blade is of inferior quality.
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Ryan S.




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PostPosted: Sat 26 May, 2012 1:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If you tuned your swords you could play a song. In my inexpert opinion, the sound of a sword could possibly used to test a sword, but only very specifically. For example, two swords that are similar should make similar tones. Also, I suppose some swords ring so high, they can't be heard?
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J. Hargis




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PostPosted: Sat 26 May, 2012 6:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Quote:
Here it is: http://www.myArmoury.com/talk/viewtopic.php?t=1488

Yes, I assumed this had been discussed before, but didn't have much luck in tracking the thread down. My keyword searches were based mostly around the word 'chime', 'chiming', etc.

Thanks Luka.

Jon

A poorly maintained weapon is likely to belong to an unsafe and careless fighter.
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