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Bruno Giordan




PostPosted: Sun 26 Feb, 2012 6:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jean Thibodeau wrote:
Peter that is Jaw Dropping awesome. Big Grin Cool

I've also noticed that with most of my better handling swords the pommel gives support to the heel of the hand ( One handed swords ) and this really makes it easier to make and control sudden stops with a sword which may mean avoiding going to far with a swing and being able to recover faster from a miss and keep one's point menacing.

As much as a well designed pommel can help you a poorly design one will get in the way and often make the gripping of the sword uncomfortable at the least.

Well, with my Albion Doge I find the same type of pommel very useful and comfortable as you describe.


I have examined far fewer originals than the mythical PJ but I can say that invariably single edged swords show this effect.

I guess that discerning customers should really appreciate this choice of PJ.
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Paul Watson




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PostPosted: Sun 26 Feb, 2012 3:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The pommel is not only beautiful and ergonomically ideal but it also looks like it coulvd deliver a lethal or very damaging blow itself
I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, but that which it protects. (Faramir, The Two Towers)
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Luka Borscak




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PostPosted: Sun 26 Feb, 2012 5:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Paul Watson wrote:
The pommel is not only beautiful and ergonomically ideal but it also looks like it coulvd deliver a lethal or very damaging blow itself


That is the greatest part of what I see as beautiful in a sword, every part has its sometimes, not obvious and subtle, function. This sword is one that is very beautiful and is a true piece of art visually, but you can also see, if you know how to look, secret or obvious functions in its every part. And its low weight really amazes me!
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Justin H. N˙˝ez




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PostPosted: Mon 27 Feb, 2012 11:09 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I am wondering how it behaves if you were to finger the guard? How much does that change the dynamic.
I too am held captive by the simplicity of design and complexity of the weapon as a whole.
As for the handle wrap, I think goat is an excellent choice. I do not know why it is not used more. I think that it would be great for covering the scabbard also; long lasting and naturally wear and water resistant.
The pommel looks like it has Moorish (can we say Moorish still without offense?) influence in there somewhere.

"Nothing in fencing is really difficult, it just takes work." - Aldo Nadi
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Paul Hansen




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PostPosted: Mon 27 Feb, 2012 11:34 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Fantastic work Peter!
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Peter Johnsson




PostPosted: Mon 27 Feb, 2012 1:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks guys!

Jean: Thanks, and yes the Albion Doge is an obvious sibling with regards to the pommel.

Julien: Yes, time is running short now. Right now it┤s one of those periods in life where you need to keep a dozen china plates spinning on rods.
-We shall see if I can finish the scabbard in time. Right now I doubt it.

Bruno: Glad to hear your observation on this.

Paul: Yes, the pommel spike feels like a weapon in itself!

Luka: This is what I appreciate with this sword and others like it: the misleadingly simple outline reveals some clever thinking when we look closer.

Justin: The sword works very well for a grip where you finger the guard! In fact, the placing of vibration nodes and pivot points suggest that this was an important feature in its use. Goat leather is a favorite material. Only set back is that is is a bit more tricky to get an even stain from the leather dye.
Moorish influence? Perhaps? I do not know if this is a pommel type you find on Spanish swords as well. It would be interesting to look for possible international, cross cultural influences.
The type looks very Gothic to me, but the Gothic style has lots of far away influences anyway.

Michael and Paul: Thank you!
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Nils Anderssen




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PostPosted: Tue 28 Feb, 2012 1:56 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That sword is just getting better and better Happy

I have also had the problem with dying leather without any stains... and it has iritated me for a long time since if you dye the leather during the tanning prosess it will be even.
So, the other day I tried a little experiment with dying calf leather for a scabbard with a spray gun, and it turned out really well. It did not get any stains or spots, just a even colour on the whole surface. The piece was about 80 x 15 cm.

The way I did this was to first spray the surface with the colour, and at this point it was a little bit uneven, but still better than what I would expect by doing it with a pencil/piece of cloth. This was the first time I used a spray gun so I had no experience at all. Then I let it dry for about fifteen minuets before I washed it in water. Then after drying it, the colour on the surface was completely even.

The spray gun I used was from Games Workshop and is meant to use on miniatures and looks like this:

http://www.games-workshop.com/MEDIA_CustomPro...nparts.jpg

It is fairly cheap and works really well.

The only drawback is that you use more colour than you normally would, but then again, it is fairly cheap.

Hope this helps you out Happy
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Peter Johnsson




PostPosted: Tue 28 Feb, 2012 3:16 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thank you Nils! That is something I just might try.

This time I wrapped the leather before dying it. I shall let is sit until the leather is dry and the glue has set and then gently dampen the leather before applying the dye with a brush. (A spray gun would come in handy instead of the brush!)

The sword shall now sit until tomorrow so that the hide glue has good time to create a good bond between the cord and leather.



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Taylor Ellis




PostPosted: Tue 28 Feb, 2012 5:26 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Eek!

Sublime as usual Peter.
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Peter Johnsson




PostPosted: Wed 29 Feb, 2012 12:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Leather cover of the grip is now finished. The imprint of the cord is polished down a bit and the goat leather is dyed a deep mahogany red. You can see a bit if the cord wrap under the thin leather. I think this adds an organic quality that contrast against the steel of the sword.


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Artis Aboltins




PostPosted: Wed 29 Feb, 2012 1:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That's fabulous, Peter! I just regret I can not be in London to see the sword in person...
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Justin H. N˙˝ez




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PostPosted: Wed 29 Feb, 2012 6:41 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ok, so that settles it. I want one! That grip turned out exactly beautiful Peter. I can't wait to see the scabbard and suspension.

I know you are hard pressed for time, but are you going to post final stats on it?

Also, what made me think of fingering the guard was a comment by Oakeshott in Archaeology of weapons. He was idly swinging about on of his favorite swords when suddenly had the feeling like he should slip his finger over the gaurd. Voila, the sword was a totally different creature. If I remember right I think it led him to think that many swords were and should be fingered and that it was done much earlier than previously thought. Like back to the 13th cen.?....


Anyway, Just magnificent!!!!!

"Nothing in fencing is really difficult, it just takes work." - Aldo Nadi
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Wed 29 Feb, 2012 1:11 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It's beyond organic. That grip looks like the skin of some deep-sea creature. Amazing!
-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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T.F. McCraken




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PostPosted: Wed 29 Feb, 2012 1:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I did a grip today that....I thought I did a pretty good job on.

Until I saw this one.

Beautiful!

Murphy Cool

aka "Murphy"
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"I drank what?" -Socrates
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Zach Luna




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PostPosted: Wed 29 Feb, 2012 2:29 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote




Good GOD, man!
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Scott Roush




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PostPosted: Thu 01 Mar, 2012 2:57 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

That is beautiful Peter... That deep color and the texture from the cord.

I'm really hoping that the rawhide on my next grip will allow the fine cord to show like that....

http://www.bigrockforge.com
Atlanta Blade Show table 18Q
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T.F. McCraken




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PostPosted: Thu 01 Mar, 2012 6:19 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter, one this has me kinda scratching my head and it's the term "Cord-wrapped".

You do refer to the cord you wrap around the grip to bind the hide, right? There isn't cording under the hide, is there?

I only ask because I've done quite a few grips now and I always wondered if I was missing a step.

Murphy Cool

aka "Murphy"
See ya at Bristol Renaissance Faire!

The decisions we make, dictate the life we lead.

"I drank what?" -Socrates
www.celticfuryproduction.com
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Sean Flynt
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PostPosted: Thu 01 Mar, 2012 7:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

T.F. McCraken wrote:
Peter, one this has me kinda scratching my head and it's the term "Cord-wrapped".

You do refer to the cord you wrap around the grip to bind the hide, right? There isn't cording under the hide, is there?

I only ask because I've done quite a few grips now and I always wondered if I was missing a step.

Murphy Cool


I'm not Peter, of course, but the term applies to the cord binding under the leather. You can see it in previous photos in this thread. There are many examples of cord-impressed leather over bare wood core (visible through deterioration of the leather) as well as cord-bound cores.

-Sean

"Everywhere I have searched for peace and nowhere found it, except in a corner with a book"- Thomas a Kempis (d. 1471)
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Peter Johnsson




PostPosted: Thu 01 Mar, 2012 7:48 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hey guys,
Thank you all for your kind words and questions.

There will now be a lull in postings from me on this thread as I am preparing to leave for London. The sword is finished, but the scabbard still has a few days of work for it to be completed. We shall see if I will complete it in the end.
It is up to the customer to decide if he wants a scabbard for the sword or not: The sword is sold and will be shipped to its home as I return from London.

If any of you happen to be around London over the weekend, please consider visiting the tables S°ren (of Albion Europe) and I share at the Fair on Sunday 4th of March at the Marriot Hotel.
The sword that you┤ve seen going through some of the last stages of finishing on this thread will be displayed at the Fair, together with a selection of Albion swords.
You can also pick up a catalogue where you┤ll get a first introduction to my hypothesis on medieval sword design: perhaps you┤ll then understand what it is I am so exited about :-)
http://www.londonarmsfair.com/

About cord wrapping and grips: there is cord under the leather and cord is used to compress the leather as it dries. This upper cord is removed when the glue has set after some 24 hours. In this case I removed the cord a bit earlier, when there still was a tiny bit of humidity left in the leather. Since it was still pliable, I could polish and compress it, to bring out a high gloss and remove the 3-d effect of the cord imprint. there is now only a slight texture of the cord adding a bit to the character of the leather.

For those who are interested I posted a step-by-step thread on Don Fogg┤s Bladesmith Forum on how I do leather cover on sword grips. There are some tidbits on tooling and different ways to go about this.
http://forums.dfoggknives.com/index.php?showtopic=15010&st=0

(edit: thanks Sean! We posted simultaneously :-)



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Under wrap of fine cord

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Over wrap to compress the leather and shape the ends up towards guard and pommel
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Bruno Giordan




PostPosted: Thu 01 Mar, 2012 9:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Peter Johnsson wrote:
Hey guys,
Thank you all for your kind words and questions.

There will now be a lull in postings from me on this thread as I am preparing to leave for London. The sword is finished, but the scabbard still has a few days of work for it to be completed. We shall see if I will complete it in the end.
It is up to the customer to decide if he wants a scabbard for the sword or not: The sword is sold and will be shipped to its home as I return from London.

If any of you happen to be around London over the weekend, please consider visiting the tables S°ren (of Albion Europe) and I share at the Fair on Sunday 4th of March at the Marriot Hotel.
The sword that you┤ve seen going through some of the last stages of finishing on this thread will be displayed at the Fair, together with a selection of Albion swords.
You can also pick up a catalogue where you┤ll get a first introduction to my hypothesis on medieval sword design: perhaps you┤ll then understand what it is I am so exited about :-)
http://www.londonarmsfair.com/

About cord wrapping and grips: there is cord under the leather and cord is used to compress the leather as it dries. This upper cord is removed when the glue has set after some 24 hours. In this case I removed the cord a bit earlier, when there still was a tiny bit of humidity left in the leather. Since it was still pliable, I could polish and compress it, to bring out a high gloss and remove the 3-d effect of the cord imprint. there is now only a slight texture of the cord adding a bit to the character of the leather.

For those who are interested I posted a step-by-step thread on Don Fogg┤s Bladesmith Forum on how I do leather cover on sword grips. There are some tidbits on tooling and different ways to go about this.
http://forums.dfoggknives.com/index.php?showtopic=15010&st=0

(edit: thanks Sean! We posted simultaneously :-)


Peter, I have just asked for a copy of the catalog. i would just ask you wether it will evolve or not in a book ..... Ahem.
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