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D Critchley




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PostPosted: Mon 18 Apr, 2011 3:09 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tom Donoho wrote:
And I recall seeing in a catalog about 20 years ago 2 examples with turned wooden grips (in imitation of wire wrapping but no actual wrapping--grips looked original with patina and very good fit to the hilts) given a date of c. 1775-80. Would these have been for non-coms or junior officers, perhaps?


These are usually 1796''s that have had the foil removed Tom. Instead of a wire wrap some grips had a sheath of silver put over the wooden core and then imbossed with a wire pattern, probably in a press of some sort. Over time the wood shrinks and the silver foil loosens, tears and is removed, leaving the embossed pattern on the wood.
I have seen early ones with ebony grips cut in a spiral however.

David
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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Mon 18 Apr, 2011 3:41 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is a pic of my Pre-(hopefully) 1796 Infantry officer spadroon....

I also agree with you David, Spadroons really do seem like a militarized small-sword for those whose sword fighting technique leaned toward a point-centric fencing style. The single edged, rapier-esque blade just gives it a bit more leveradge against any heavier swords it might encounter.



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inkothemgard!
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Tom Donoho




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PostPosted: Tue 19 Apr, 2011 7:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

David,

Understood. But I think one of those I saw might have been an early one with an ebony grip as you have described--the spiral channels were too deep in my opinion to result from a pressed shell. It was beautiful!

Morgan,

Very nice, indeed!

BTW: I just ran across what I thought was an English flank or yoemanary (sorry, is that the correct word?) officer's saber, c. 1800-10. A beautiful sword with an exagerated curved blade and bone or ivory grip (does that indicate anything in particular?) in excellent condition. It was at a generalist antique store. I don 't know enough about these English sabers and was not feeling good about making an offer on it.

Tom
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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Tue 19 Apr, 2011 9:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The excessive curve does sound like a flank officer/light infantry officer sword. How long is the blade?
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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Tue 19 Apr, 2011 9:59 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is another great English infantry hanger that belongs to Thom R. From another thread of mine. I really like this one. Love the silver ribbon going around the grip....


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inkothemgard!
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Tom Donoho




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PostPosted: Tue 19 Apr, 2011 10:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Morgan,

I did not get measurments on that saber.

That is a nice short saber (that's what I call them--I think I picked it up from Neumann's book.) I really do find the short sabers of the American Revolutionary period fascinating. I do think a robust cuttoe would be servicable as with these short sabers. I think Neumann features a couple short sabers that were even shortened more professionally--apparently the officers were wanting something with a blade around 23 inches. One has a clipped point, so it might be a case of just bringing it up to date with the latest fashion. If we only knew!

Tom
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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Wed 20 Apr, 2011 2:16 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Tom,

I think your new found love of hunting swords and cuttoes has opened you up to a whole new range of swords! Happy

The sword at the antique shop sounds interesting. What it be immoral to get a cell-phone pic of it?

inkothemgard!
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Jack W. Englund




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PostPosted: Wed 20 Apr, 2011 6:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Morgan Butler wrote:
Here is another great English infantry hanger that belongs to Thom R. From another thread of mine. I really like this one. Love the silver ribbon going around the grip....


LOVE It.
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Tom Donoho




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PostPosted: Wed 20 Apr, 2011 10:06 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Morgan,

Perhaps you are correct. But the small-sword will always be my "first love."

Tom
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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Sat 23 Apr, 2011 9:27 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think an affection/appreciation for more than one type of sword is superior. After all, its MORE SWORDS! Big Grin
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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Thu 28 Apr, 2011 11:47 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Here is a nice french officers soldat. sigh.. Very nice. I am being very disciplined and not puchasing anything right now, even though I wassorely tempted. It went for a great price too. Ah well, we can view it here. The elongated rectangular knuckle guard makes me think it is early first half of the 18th cen.


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inkothemgard!
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Timo Nieminen




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PostPosted: Thu 28 Apr, 2011 4:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

A Chinese sword (single-edged, thus a "dao"). This sword was discussed earlier in this thread. Dated as 18th century by Harvey Withers.

It's short, it's light, and if new, it would slice with ease.

Overall length: 735mm
Blade length: 580mm
Mass: 858g
Centre of mass: 12cm past the rivet on the guard
Thickness of blade (at points marked on figure): A: 4.5mm, B: 3.9mm, C: 4.0mm, D: 3.0mm, E: 2.6mm



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Chinese dao.

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Thu 28 Apr, 2011 6:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Very nice! It reminds me of a falchion in a way.
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Timo Nieminen




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PostPosted: Fri 29 Apr, 2011 1:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Harvey Withers described it as "An early 1700's Chinese Falchion sword", so it isn't just you. And it is pretty much a Chinese falchion.

(Could call it a "messer", too. "Messer" is a literal translation of "dao", even.)

"In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.
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D Critchley




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PostPosted: Mon 02 May, 2011 8:20 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Some more of my 18th and 19th century swords here, now I've finally started to put this list together

http://www.sites.google.com/site/georgeiiiswords/
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Morgan Butler




PostPosted: Mon 02 May, 2011 1:20 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

D Critchley wrote:
Some more of my 18th and 19th century swords here, now I've finally started to put this list together

http://www.sites.google.com/site/georgeiiiswords/




Impressive format and catologue, Mr. Critchley!

inkothemgard!
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D Critchley




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PostPosted: Mon 02 May, 2011 1:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Morgan

David
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Tom Donoho




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PostPosted: Mon 02 May, 2011 7:24 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

David,

A very nice web page display!

Would you say something about that basket hilted sword--it's quite a looker--I'm not a basket hilt type of guy, but this one appeals to me.

Oops! I see you have an additional page there with lots of information--sorry I missed it initially.

I am glad to see that you included your small-sword. Big Grin

Tom
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Jake DiVeronica




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PostPosted: Wed 11 May, 2011 12:18 am    Post subject: "C.D. Wolfe New York"         Reply with quote

Hi all,

This is my first post, coincidentally of my first historic sword which I acquired last summer. My grandfather's neighbor was willing to part with it for $500 despite it supposedly being in his family since the War of 1812. If that was the case, someone down his ancestry decided to take a file towards the end of the blade for weed eating purposes. Any thoughts or comments greatly appreciated! (yes this is early 19th century, but others were doing it too!)

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/155/1000469b.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/222/1000476.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/862/1000481.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/705/1000471yt.jpg/

http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/846/1000495h.jpg/

-Jake D.
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Tom Donoho




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PostPosted: Wed 11 May, 2011 1:03 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Jake,

I am not sure that this is War of 1812 period--seems as if the etching would place it after that period. There is a tendency to attribute stirrup-hilted sabers to the War of 1812 period, but this style of sword was in service into the Mexican and Civil War periods. Whatever the actual period, it looks lke a nice saber.

Tom
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