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Bob Burns




PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct, 2005 4:29 pm    Post subject: Danish War Axe by Arms & Armor         Reply with quote

I am hoping this is one of my wife's consideratiions on her xmas shopping list for me, or the Sparth Axe. I almost bought the Danish War Axe this past summer, but I'd bought so many swords in such a short time, I thought it best for where my health is concerned to wait on the axe. Though my wife is a very sweet lady, she does have a German temper! LOL! I also came close to buying the Horsemans's Axe or the German Flail, but selected the Spiked Mace instead. As I like the versatility of it, the long spike on top is a nice feature for short range stabbing techniques.

Though I am a complete novice to these weapons and swords, I seem to recall something on the History Channel some time back about a book from the 15th century or so (don't recall which century it was) that was a swordsman's instructional book depicting drawings of swords being used in methods never before considered. You guys are probably very familiar with this.

There is a weapon that I am expert with though, that is the Nunchuku, either one pair or two pair simultaneously. Now you wanna talk about a weapon that will bang you up while learning, I walked around for months when I was 15 with bruises on my forearms and elbows.

I had a passion for the nunchuku, as well as karate, but nothing like the passion I have for swords and medieval weapons. Besides, due to my self inflicted back problems, my karate days are over. Sometimes I wonder if my wife is right, that I was a barbarian warlord in a past life. I know the first time I ever got on a horse, I rode a very energetic horse, and it was like the most natural thing in the world.

All I know is that I sure do love this medieval stuff! Boy and howdy, as my wife says, it is all I talk about anymore!

One thing for sure, I have a heck of a lot to learn!


Happy Collecting,

Bob
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct, 2005 4:35 pm    Post subject: Re: Henry V comparison to Caithness         Reply with quote

Bob Burns wrote:
I did not say these swords were exactly the same, I only alluded that they were somewhat the same in relative size and that both are short but deadly cleavers and thrusters, though yes the Henry V is a better thruster.


Bob,
You're correct, you never said "exactly." Happy Since you said the Henry V was "like" the Sovereign, I just wanted to take the opportunity to talk about some differences between them, since I've owned them both. Interestingly enough, people have remarked before how similar those swords are, and they are really different animals entirely, meant to face different circumstances.

Happy

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Steve Grisetti




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PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct, 2005 4:53 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad Arnow wrote:
Here's the latest addition, Albion's Sempach with magenta grip.

This is quite a sword. It seems to be a little under-rated, as Type XVII's do in general. It cut soft targets (pool noodles) with great ease, something I didn't really expect, given the blade's cross-section. It's agile in the thrust without lacking authority in the cut. Nice.

Congratulations on the new acquisition, Chad.
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct, 2005 6:31 pm    Post subject: Re: Congratulations Chad         Reply with quote

Bob Burns wrote:
Something else I very much enjoy, the different kind of collections, like Patrick, you gear towards a particular kind of sword and a time period, and have umpteen versions, I think that is very interesting indeed.


Bob,
I missed this comment before. Sorry! As Aaron mentioned, my collection spans about 700 years worth of weapons, from circa the 12th century (the ArmArt) to the early 19th century (a sgian dubh) and contains no repeats within the Oakeshott Typology, unless you count a single-handed Type XII and a big XIIa, or in types of dagger.

Swords:
12th century - ArmArt (Type XII-ish)
Late 13th century - Albion Baron (Type XIIa)
Late 13th century/early 14th - Albion Sovereign (Type XIV)
Late 14th century/early 15th - Albion Sempach (Type XVII)
Eary 15th century - Del Tin Visconte sword (Type XV)
Mid 15th century - Albion Regent (Type XVIIIa)
Late 17th century - Armour Class basket hilt

Daggers/Misc.:
13th-14th century - A&A Classic/Crusader dagger hybrid
Early 14th century great helm
15th century - Vince Evans ballock dagger
Late 17th/early 18th century - Vince Evans dirk
Mid-18th century - Kirby Wise/Art Elwell sgian achles
Early 19th century - Michael McRae sgian dubh

So, in terms of time periods and different types of swords/daggers, it's pretty diverse. I have different kinds of wheel pommels (2), different kinds of scent stopper pommels (2), a brazil nut pommel, and a fishtail pommel, plus a basket hilt pommel. I have short single-handers, a regular size single-hander, a basket hilt, and 3 very different longswords. The knightly single handers are a dedicated cutter, and early cut-and-thrust, and a thruster. The longswords also are pretty different in terms of Oakeshott Types, blade cross-sections, hilts and purposes (1 fairly dedicated cutter, 1 fairly dedicated thruster and 1 cut and thrust).

So there's plenty of variety in there. I don't have any rapiers (but I used to) or sideswords (used to) or impact weapons (used to) or shields or spears. But there's no particular kind of sword I have umpteen versions of unless you count the majority of my swords as simply "medieval swords." Happy There's nothing at all that I have "umpteen" versions of, so your statement is a little confusing to me.

We don't all have to have the same philosophy in collecting. In fact, that diversity brings a lot of fun stuff to the table. In my own mind at least, my collection is plenty diverse, especially given my interests and my self-regulation of its size, and I'm happy with it. Happy

Happy

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Bob Burns




PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct, 2005 8:02 pm    Post subject: My Statement         Reply with quote

Was really nothing more than humor, actually it was not directed at you. It was hypothetical, in other words, there are probably people that want to focus on one particular time period. It was also meant to amplify where my own direction is headed. Which is "no" particular direction at all. I see a piece, feel it, if I like it and I can afford it, I buy it.
That's all that was meant, nothing more, nothing less. Just some lighthearted humor.

Happy Collecting,

Bob

Besides, I am way too new at this to know all the time periods of all the various swords. lol
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Patrick Kelly




PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct, 2005 8:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Since we're suddenly into self-analysis of our collections allow me to do the same. Big Grin

My collection also spans a pretty broad time frame, although my intention is to eventually form a collection that represents the development of the sword from the migration era through the high middle ages. I mean, when you get into the later medieval period with all of that sissy plate armour and fru-fru clothing, well, who really likes that stuff. Razz

My current collection of stuff in rough chronology.

Albion Jarl: a 9th-10th century design that roughly corresponds to Oakeshott's Type X (more correctly a Geibig Type 4 in this case)

Also included in this time frame: Medieval reproductions viking helm, Mercenary's Taylor viking shield, Hanwei spear, and Vince Evans scramaseax. All profiled in our latest update. An A&A Danish axe as well.

Two Type X swords by Peter Johnsson and Vince Evans: "Big Johnsson" and "Milestone" respectively. These two swords represent the classic form of the knightly sword from roughly the 11th to the 13th century.
Albion Knight: represents a further refinement of the single-handed knightly sword. (Type XII)
Albion Baron: This sword represents the first definitive development of the knightly longsword. (Type XIIa)

Other ancillary "stuff": mail hauberk and coif, Olmutz style helm from Get Dressed For Battle, Mercenary's Taylor kite shield, and an A&A 12th century spear.

Albion Sempach: Represents the 14th cent. transition of the knightly longsword into a thrusting dedicated instrument. (Type XVII)
Albion Regent: Represents the 15th cent. development of the knightly longsword into a true dual-purpose cut and thrust weapon. (Type XVIIIb)

Also included here is an incoming A&A Wallace Ballock Knife set.

The collection's focus has tightened quite a bit from the "one of everything" philosophy, but there's still a fairly broad timeframe there.

"I'd rather go upriver with 7 studs, than a 100 sh!theads." - COL Charlie Beckwith, founder SFODD
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T.L. Johnson




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PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct, 2005 9:32 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Aaron Schnatterly wrote:
...I've done some cutting with my Regent as well. It hits like a tank. It's downright rude. In comparison to the Ritter, Brescia, for example, on 2-liter water-filled bottles:

Ritter - smooth, clean "ring-spalsh"

Brescia - a nice, very authoritative, clean "tink-pop-splash" and the top falls away.

Regent - a rather brutal "PING-BAM-splash", still a decent cut, but it just hammers at the target. It shocked me the first time I cut with it - and still amazes me. The blade is so thick, with that hollow-ground diamond, it blows it's way through.

I don't know if that adds any clarity or not as to how it performs... it's really pretty awesome.

I always figured that the Regent, should it ever be employed so (against the undead or some other morally correct adversary, of course), it would be the most likely sword where vampiric/demonic/zombie heads and appendages would actually 'pop' or flip off due to the slope of the hollow-ground ridge— I mean, really send things flying. In other words, no such thing as a "clean" hit with a Regent— they'll take stuff apart for you.
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Taylor Ellis




PostPosted: Tue 04 Oct, 2005 10:03 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Patrick Kelly wrote:
Since we're suddenly into self-analysis of our collections allow me to do the same. Big Grin

My collection also spans a pretty broad time frame, although my intention is to eventually form a collection that represents the development of the sword from the migration era through the high middle ages. I mean, when you get into the later medieval period with all of that sissy plate armour and fru-fru clothing, well, who really likes that stuff. Razz

My current collection of stuff in rough chronology.

Albion Jarl: a 9th-10th century design that roughly corresponds to Oakeshott's Type X (more correctly a Geibig Type 4 in this case)

Also included in this time frame: Medieval reproductions viking helm, Mercenary's Taylor viking shield, Hanwei spear, and Vince Evans scramaseax. All profiled in our latest update. An A&A Danish axe as well.

Two Type X swords by Peter Johnsson and Vince Evans: "Big Johnsson" and "Milestone" respectively. These two swords represent the classic form of the knightly sword from roughly the 11th to the 13th century.
Albion Knight: represents a further refinement of the single-handed knightly sword. (Type XII)
Albion Baron: This sword represents the first definitive development of the knightly longsword. (Type XIIa)

Other ancillary "stuff": mail hauberk and coif, Olmutz style helm from Get Dressed For Battle, Mercenary's Taylor kite shield, and an A&A 12th century spear.

Albion Sempach: Represents the 14th cent. transition of the knightly longsword into a thrusting dedicated instrument. (Type XVII)
Albion Regent: Represents the 15th cent. development of the knightly longsword into a true dual-purpose cut and thrust weapon. (Type XVIIIb)

Also included here is an incoming A&A Wallace Ballock Knife set.

The collection's focus has tightened quite a bit from the "one of everything" philosophy, but there's still a fairly broad timeframe there.


Hey Patrick, I've watched your collection grow over the last 6 years or so, and mate, it's the best one around IMO. If you add in a Cashen piece (maybe an early pattern welded "knightly" X (like the one in Records), you'd have a sword from the top 3 contemporary western styled bladesmiths on the planet.
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Russ Ellis




PostPosted: Wed 05 Oct, 2005 6:54 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

You guys goals are complicated. Happy Mine is simple. Buy everything in Arms and Armor's catalogue and then (or in concert)fill in the gaps in Oakeshott's typology from whatever source offers nice swords for that category. Happy After that I'll start dealing with buying swords that have a particular pommel or cross type etc. Happy
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Wed 05 Oct, 2005 7:14 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Russ Ellis wrote:
You guys goals are complicated. Happy Mine is simple. Buy everything in Arms and Armor's catalogue and then (or in concert)fill in the gaps in Oakeshott's typology from whatever source offers nice swords for that category. Happy


My only real collecting goal is simply to have stuff I like. Happy I've never intended to have a collection like Patrick's that shows the development of the sword or have the whole Oakeshott series or anything like that. It's just ended up looking like I planned it out carefully. I like the diversity of it, but it's never been a big part of the ordering/decision process. The Sempach is the only one I bought because I liked it and because it fit a specific niche in the collection that I felt was lacking. If I had bought entirely based on looks, I might have bought that Landgraf instead. But the Sempach is easily matched to historical examples (my preference), whereas the Landgraf is an amalgam of different swords. Plus, I already had a few wheel pommels in the collection, and a few pommels with engraved crosses. Diversity, baby... Happy Going forward, if I ever get the money (ha ha, I'm a classical musician - ain't gonna happen), I'd like to add a helm, dagger or impact weapon, and pair of gauntlets that matched each sword I currently have in era/locale. So I guess I need an early flat-top great helm, bascinet, pair of hourglass gauntlets, late 14th century rondel dagger, sallet, pair of gothic mitten gauntlets, and a winning lotto ticket. Happy

I think it's cool all the different collecting philosophies. Some people want stuff by all the same maker. Some like the Oakeshott series. Some want to trace the development of arms and armour. Some want full kits (clothes, armour, weapons) from their favorite era. Some, like me, want random stuff that they like.

Happy

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Russ Ellis




PostPosted: Wed 05 Oct, 2005 11:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad Arnow wrote:
My only real collecting goal is simply to have stuff I like. Happy I've never intended to have a collection like Patrick's that shows the development of the sword or have the whole Oakeshott series or anything like that. It's just ended up looking like I planned it out carefully. I like the diversity of it, but it's never been a big part of the ordering/decision process. The Sempach is the only one I bought because I liked it and because it fit a specific niche in the collection that I felt was lacking. If I had bought entirely based on looks, I might have bought that Landgraf instead. But the Sempach is easily matched to historical examples (my preference), whereas the Landgraf is an amalgam of different swords. Plus, I already had a few wheel pommels in the collection, and a few pommels with engraved crosses. Diversity, baby... Happy Going forward, if I ever get the money (ha ha, I'm a classical musician - ain't gonna happen), I'd like to add a helm, dagger or impact weapon, and pair of gauntlets that matched each sword I currently have in era/locale. So I guess I need an early flat-top great helm, bascinet, pair of hourglass gauntlets, late 14th century rondel dagger, sallet, pair of gothic mitten gauntlets, and a winning lotto ticket. Happy

I think it's cool all the different collecting philosophies. Some people want stuff by all the same maker. Some like the Oakeshott series. Some want to trace the development of arms and armour. Some want full kits (clothes, armour, weapons) from their favorite era. Some, like me, want random stuff that they like.


Lol good for you Chad! Swords in the end are supposed to be fun. Happy

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Patrick Kelly




PostPosted: Wed 05 Oct, 2005 1:23 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Taylor wrote:
Hey Patrick, I've watched your collection grow over the last 6 years or so, and mate, it's the best one around IMO.


Thanks! There's a lot of other very neat collections out there. Mac's scottish collection is very impressive, and Chad's got a couple of things I'd love to have.

"I'd rather go upriver with 7 studs, than a 100 sh!theads." - COL Charlie Beckwith, founder SFODD
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Patrick Kelly




PostPosted: Wed 05 Oct, 2005 1:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad wrote:
My only real collecting goal is simply to have stuff I like.


Me too, but the problem is that I like them all. Big Grin Since I don't have a warehouse to house the stuff, or a bank account to match, I've forced myself to focus the collection. It also appeals to my anal need for order!

"I'd rather go upriver with 7 studs, than a 100 sh!theads." - COL Charlie Beckwith, founder SFODD
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Sat 18 Feb, 2006 12:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Folks,
I've wanted a nice scabbard for my Sovereign for a while. Albion's prices were just too high for me, and their wait was too long. I was impressed by Aaron Schnatterly's scabbards, so I sent him my Sovereign last summer for a scabbard. He made a wood core and covered it with leather. At the time, though, he didn't have the tools to work with brass. Before he could get them and learn how to work brass, Hurricane Katrina hit his area. Since I knew he had a lot more important things to worry about than my scabbard, we agreed to leave the scabbard unfinished. The core fits really nice and is very streamlined. The leather cover is nice, too, and matches the grip pretty well.

I now needed to have a chape made and a suspension done. Unfortunately for me, most scabbard makers were unwilling to give it a go. When Kevin Iseli announced that he was striking out on its own, I contacted him to finish it. He agreed and did a great job.

I wanted a simple suspension appropriate for early in the 14th century. I also wanted something a little different. I found an effigy in The Archeology of Weapons and asked him to do a belt/suspension like it (pictured below). The effigy shows a narrow waist belt strap and wider one attached to the scabbard. On Kevin's rendition, the wide belt splits off on each side into the narrow waist portion and wider scabbard part. This makes for a really comfortable wear. In the interest of my wallet, I opted to forgo the rosettes on the belt. Happy



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Original suspension

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On my chubby self

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Chape with simple filework

Happy

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Greyson Brown




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PostPosted: Sat 18 Feb, 2006 1:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I've always like that effigy, and I really like Aaron's/Kevin's interpertaion of it. The scabbard is nicely shaped, and Kevin got the buckle right (I don't know why, but that buckle always catches my eye), too. He even used the knot that I like to finish it off. I've wanted to see him use that knot on one of his scabbards.

Congratulations, Chad!

Great job, Aaron and Kevin!

-Grey

P.S. Was the chape made by Aaron or Kevin?

"So long as I can keep the path of honor I am well content."
-Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The White Company


Last edited by Greyson Brown on Sat 18 Feb, 2006 1:39 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Kenton Spaulding




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PostPosted: Sat 18 Feb, 2006 1:37 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Congratulations Chad. That scabbard looks really nice. The colors look very natural. Very nice indeed. I too admire the work I've seen from Aaron in the Albums. He seems to have a real talent for this kind of work. It is nice to see a sword as nice as the Sovereign with a scabbard that does it justice. Congrats again.

Kenton
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Sat 18 Feb, 2006 1:46 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Greyson Brown wrote:
I've always like that effigy, and I really like Aaron's/Kevin's interpertaion of it. The scabbard is nicely shaped, and Kevin got the buckle right (I don't know why, but that buckle always catches my eye), too. He even used the knot that I like to finish it off. I've wanted to see him use that knot on one of his scabbards.

P.S. Was the chape made by Aaron or Kevin?


Greyson,
The chape was Kevin's work. It's basically just a simple U-shape gutter, but the filework sets it off nicely. The whole package is just what I was looking for: something simple, yet different, yet nice. Happy The rosettes would have been nice, but I can't justify the extra expense right now. I could always have them added later, though, especially if I win the Powerball. Happy

Kenton,
Thanks! Aaron's scabbard core is really nice. The two bumps in the fuller help lock it in, and the fit is really good overall. Aaron brought his first scabbard to Atlanta last year. I was impressed.

I've always admired Kevin's work, too, but I never thought I'd be able to afford it; I also didn't want the multi-year wait through Albion.

Happy

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Kenton Spaulding




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PostPosted: Sat 18 Feb, 2006 1:52 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I might be a little bit confused. Did Aaron do the suspension, or did Kevin? When I read it I thought Kevin did the chape only, did he do the suspension too? Regardless of who made it it looks nice. You had to bring up Powerball didn't you...if I win I will buy everybody a new scabbard! Rosettes and all! (might take pretty near the whole $350 million Eek! )

Kenton
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Sat 18 Feb, 2006 1:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Kenton Spaulding wrote:
I might be a little bit confused. Did Aaron do the suspension, or did Kevin? When I read it I thought Kevin did the chape only, did he do the suspension too? Regardless of who made it it looks nice. You had to bring up Powerball didn't you...if I win I will buy everybody a new scabbard! Rosettes and all! (might take pretty near the whole $350 million Eek! )

Kenton


Aaron did the woodwork and leather cover only (the dark brown leather). Kevin did the chape and suspension/belt/buckles.

As for the Powerball, I have my tickets. I doubt I'll win, of course, but I wouldn't turn down $365 million USD in lotto money. Happy

Happy

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Steve Grisetti




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PostPosted: Sat 18 Feb, 2006 4:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks really nice, Chad. I haven't picked up any "non-transport" scabbards, yet, and I really look forward to acquiring some.
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